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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

October 28, 2009

Speaker: Dr. Normand Mousseau, CRC in Computational Physics of Complex Materials, Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal 

Title: Understanding the energy crisis and its impact on Canada 

Abstract: Even in the middle of one of the worst recessions of the last 100 years, oil prices remain at three times their historical prices. This situation should raise alarms for both governments and citizens as it suggests that the era of cheap and plentiful energy is behind us. Unless we prepare for the shock of oil prices shooting through the roof again, as the world economy recovers, we risk being plunged back in a deeper crises from which it will be more difficult to extract ourselves. In this talk, I will review the worldwide energy situation, its impact on Canada and Ontario and indicate some possible directions that could be taken to avoid the worst.

Discipline: Mathematics