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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

October 5, 2012

Title: An Overview Of Some Recent Results In Psychiatric Patient Stratification Using Novel Data Analysis Methods

Speaker: Joseph Geraci, Toronto General Hospital and Queen’s University

Abstract: A strong desire exists to determine the efficacy of treatment for MDD (major depressive disorder) and other psychiatric conditions from first visit MRIs and clinical testing. I will present some preliminary work that is leading to this goal for rTMS treatments (repeated trans-cranial magnetic stimulation) for MDD. The same effort will be made to create an algorithm that scores the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatments. The methods include techniques from graph theory and machine learning. I will also present a novel machine learning algorithm called Butterfly that I have created over the last two years based on discrete dynamical systems. This talk will be technically elementary and no knowledge of any of the mathematical concepts will be assumed.